Eating Vegan 2018
Not every product you pick up or food shop that you buy has to be expensive, when you are talking in terms of Vegan friendly foods. People tend to think that you have to grab the meat free alternatives or buy the branded vegan foods, which can be quite costly to be eating vegan properly. Well, they would be very wrong. Most items that you can buy, that are cheap and come in quantity tend to be the supermarkets own brand (try an alternative of what you would normally eat). It makes me cringe when I see comments of people saying that they could not stop eating meat because being vegan is so expensive and would make their weekly food shop a lot more than it already is. But, since when has meat been cheap? Unless, it has been bought from a takeaway, it is probably more expensive than buying vegetables.


I find when starting a food shop, I start off with the basics of the food that I will actually need throughout the week, starting from one category (such as fridge, freezer, pantry/store cupboad items). My basics would be items such as bread, milk, butter, potatoes, mushrooms, etc. Foods I know I reach for most and have to top up on more often than so. I finally then go through the categories again, one by one and plan out foods that I am going to buy, perhaps for a recipe I have in mind or a dish I know how to cook and what ingredients I know I need to make it. I think of the foods I can use to bulk cook and meal prep for the week ahead, it doesn't need to be made complicated, when in reality it is really quite easy.

Eating Vegan 2018
Eating Vegan 2018






What do I stock in my fridge?

My fridge can sometimes go one of two ways, it can either be really full or it can only be semi-full. Depending on what I buy, as I tend to try and buy frozen more than fresh, as it doesn't get used up before it goes off, so I try to find frozen alternatives for the fresh foods. The fridge contains most of the sauces we use (Yes, I fill my fridge with tomato, bbq, chilli & mint sauce, etc) - I am one of them people. But let's crack onto the items, that are relatively cheap to buy and easy to stock up on once used up:

  • Mushrooms, Vitalite butter, Pickled onions, Pickled gherkins, Lettuce, Cucumber, Cellery, Stew Pack, Peppers & Alpro milk.

This is just a few of the items that I will typically buy in a food shop, as they tend to go a long way and are great to bulk cook with, as they will keep for the week and are very handy when I need lunches for work the next day. I can pick up most of these from Aldi, but will try and keep it to the same Supermarket or online purchase if I can. It saves not only time, but you may find certain supermarkets will have deals on. You can sometimes find them in the reduced section or you can find a whole cucumber for 40p and a whole lettuce for 45p!

Eating Vegan 2018

Eating Vegan 2018


What do I stock in my freezer?

The freezer for me is my most important, as I like to have products that keep - such as tinned foods. Fresh foods have a shorter shelf life, than that of freezer and food cupboard products. There is always a lot more product in freezer foods as well and work out a lot cheaper. It may be more expensive for a bag or box of food, but I assure you, you will get more use out of freezer foods than you would if you were to buy fresh constantly. There are also a lot more alternatives in the freezer, in terms of meat replacements. Such as burgers, sausages, mince and meat balls - the ones I buy work out at £1.50 a packet, so I buy two of each.

  • Meat free meatballs, Mince, Sausages, Burgers, Frozen peppers, Mixed vegetables, Vegetable fingers, Hash browns, Frozen fruit & Vegetable stir fry.

Buying meat free mince is one of my must haves, as I love to make a good spaghetti bolognese or a chilli con carne. It is so easy to use, very adaptable to any dish and the amount of mince you get is plenty. I hardly have to use any when I am bulk cooking, as I tend to use a lot of veg to bulk out meals, so don't have to worry about the meat substitutes too much. For £1.50 a bag, you are not burning a whole in your pocket and can buy enough that will last you the month. I still have two bags left out of three and we're into the second week of January and the bag I just finished off was bought half way through December.

Eating Vegan 2018

Eating Vegan 2018


What do I stock in my pantry?

It is quite weird saying pantry, when I have only ever been used to saying 'in the cupboard', when I have lived with my parents or lived in a house where the only form of storage to keep your food in was a fridge, freezer or a cupboard. But now, living in a flat - I have a pantry! It does have it's downsides though because of the kitchen only being small, it is filled up with pots, pans, plates, cups & cooking utensils! So would be helpful to have them at your finger tips, however, the food in the pantry is plentiful and I have organised it in a way so I can check what stock I have and what I need to fill up on if I am ever going to run out.

  • Baked beans, Kidney beans, Lentils, Mixed beans, Chickpeas, Spaghetti hoops, Soups, Chopped tomatoes, Pasatta, Noodles, Spaghetti, Penne pasta, Cereal, Bread, Potatoes, Onions, Soba noodles, Soya sauce, Spices, Gravy, Salt, Pepper, Frylight, Flour, Cornflour, Cous Cous, Rice, etc!

When I do my food shop, I don't go too extravagant. I just live by my means and only buy the foods that I will need and eat most of. It's not to say that I would not buy treats, because I do. But even then, that does not have to prove expensive, there is a lot of treats out there that are cheap and cheerful and will do the same job as your 'branded junk food'. You can get a tin of spaghetti hoops for as little as 17p and these are my favourite, so I always stick in at least 4 tins in a monthly shop. Mixed beans and chickpeas are also a few pence, so it isn't breaking the budget.

Eating Vegan 2018

What I find that helps most is always looking for supermarket own brand items, you don't need to go full militant vegan to be vegan, trying the best as you can is the best course of action to take. You may get your preachy vegan, but I promise we are not all like that. Look for different types of foods and scan the prices, see which one works out the cheapest and buy that. Figure out how much you will need for the week or the month, depending on how big your shop is and work out how many items you need and what items you will be repurchasing more of. This will give you a realistic budget to go by and when you live with an omni like me, then it will put it into perspective of how much cheaper your shop is compared to theres!

What kind of vegan foods do you like buying or cooking with?